INTERNATIONAL ARBITRATION IN THE DUTCH CARIBBEAN

The UNCITRAL Model Law is applicable

Parties with a legal dispute can turn to the public court system to settle the dispute; however, instead of bringing a lawsuit in a public court, they can also opt for arbitration. Arbitration is a form of private dispute settlement in which the parties instruct one or more persons (arbitrators) to render a binding decision on their dispute. The arbitrators may be jurists, but they can also be laypersons. People with specific expertise or experience in a certain branch or industry are often chosen as arbitrator.

Parties can include a so-called arbitration clause in …
Read the rest »

06
Jan 2016
CATEGORY

Legal

COMMENTS No Comments

LITIGATION IN THE DUTCH CARIBBEAN

If you need a troubleshooter in your corner

The civil court system in the Dutch Caribbean (Aruba, Bonaire, Curaçao, St. Maarten, St. Eustatius and Saba) consists of three tiers; first instance cases are brought before the Court of First Instance. Appeal cases are brought before the Joint Court of Appeal. When all normal appeal procedures have been exhausted, cassation cases can be brought before the Court of Cassation or Supreme Court (Hoge Raad) in The Hague in the Netherlands.

All adversarial proceedings in the Dutch Caribbean shall be initiated by means of a petition to the Court of First Instance. …
Read the rest »

19
Feb 2014
CATEGORY

Legal

COMMENTS No Comments

SYMPOSIUM ON 35 YEARS OF THE CURACAO BAR ASSOCIATION (16 NOVEMBER 2012)

Presentation by Karel Frielink – President (part 2)

Civil Litigation Law should be better

So now I will deal with the subject of this symposium. I begin straight away with a provoking statement: Our Civil Litigation Law should be better. This goes further than it ‘could’ be better. However, we shouldn’t only think about the question of how the law should be improved but also about the question of whether or not judges and advocates (attorneys, lawyers) are operating optimally and whether adjustments to the system can contribute to a better operation and to a better administration of justice. And …
Read the rest »

07
Dec 2012
CATEGORY

Legal

COMMENTS No Comments

THE DUTCH CARIBBEAN AND ROME I AND ROME II

Nothing has changed as of 10-10-10

The Country the Netherlands Antilles consisted of Bonaire, Curacao, St. Maarten, St. Eustatius and Saba, and formed part of the Kingdom of the Netherlands. On October 10, 2010 the Netherlands Antilles ceased to exist as a country. Two new countries were born on that date: the country Curacao and the country St. Maarten. The three remaining islands (Bonaire, St. Eustatius and Saba, a.k.a. the BES-islands) became special overseas territories (sort of municipalities) of the Netherlands. The question is whether the new status of the islands mentioned means that treaties to which the Netherlands is …
Read the rest »

01
Feb 2011
CATEGORY

Legal

COMMENTS No Comments

INTERNATIONAL NON-CONTRACTUAL LIABILITY FROM A DUTCH PERSPECTIVE

Introduction

Financial law is not an exclusively national affair. Cross-border transactions and service provisions have been common place for a very long time. Harmonisation of rules has been worked towards in a European context for decades. Leaving aside special subject matters such as liability for products and road accidents, the (partial) harmonisation of the rules in respect of the cross-border tort (wrongful act) has only relatively recently been realised.

Rome II, which concerns the law applicable in respect of non-contractual obligations, has been in force in the Netherlands since 11 January 2009. It applies to non-contractual obligations which have arisen after that …
Read the rest »

31
Jan 2011
CATEGORY

Legal

COMMENTS No Comments

PRESENTING FACTS IN DUTCH CARIBBEAN COURT PROCEEDINGS

Facts must be presented fully and truthfully

Legal proceedings are initiated by a petition filed with the Courts. A petition is a document stating, among other things, the names and addresses of the parties, the nature of the dispute (including the relevant facts of the case), the competent court, and the demand for relief.

The significance of the petition should not be underestimated. Filing a petition with the court stops the statute of limitations running for that case. A petition should clearly state the facts and specify the relief sought, in order to enable the court to render a default …
Read the rest »

03
Nov 2010
CATEGORY

Legal

COMMENTS No Comments

INQUIRY PROCEDURE TO BE INTRODUCED IN THE DUTCH CARIBBEAN

The Joint Court will become the forum of choice for corporate disputes

Earlier in 2010, a draft bill was proposed to amend the Corporate Code (Book 2 Civil Code) of Curacao, St. Maarten, Bonaire, St. Eustatius and Saba (which formerly constituted the Netherlands Antilles). The proposed legislation introduces a so-called inquiry procedure for, amongst others, limited liability companies. The inquiry procedure (a.k.a. investigation proceedings) can result in a court ordered investigation into the affairs of a corporation.

Shareholders of such a corporation (i.e. an NV or BV) may file a petition with the Joint Court of Justice of Aruba, Curacao …
Read the rest »

27
Oct 2010
CATEGORY

Corporate

COMMENTS No Comments

THE DUTCH CARIBBEAN INCORPORATION DOCTRINE

The courts apply the law of the state where the legal entity was incorporated

The Netherlands Antilles adheres to the Incorporation Doctrine (Netherlands Antilles State Ordinance of 9 September 1960, which entered into force on the 10th of September 1960, P.B. 1960, 166). According to this doctrine, the internal affairs of a corporation are governed solely by the laws of the state in which it was formally incorporated. This doctrine was confirmed in the cases of Natco Trust v. mr Thesseling q.q., Hoge Raad (Dutch Supreme Court) 20 April 1990, NJ 1991, 560; TAR-Justicia 1 (1991), p. 24-35, and IBC …
Read the rest »

31
Aug 2010
CATEGORY

Corporate

COMMENTS No Comments

NON-POSSESSORY PLEDGE UNDER THE LAWS OF ARUBA

A non-possessory pledge requires a deed

Security rights are an important issue, especially in financing transactions. A company may, for example, guarantee the obligations of another company under a certain loan facility. There are several alternatives, one of which will be discussed here.

Under the laws of Aruba there are several kinds of pledges, in particular, the possessory and the non-possessory pledge. In the case of a possessory pledge, the physical control of the assets concerned will be transferred from the owner/borrower to the bank/lender.

In the case of a non-possessory pledge, regarding for example registered shares, the pledge is …
Read the rest »

17
Aug 2010
CATEGORY

Legal

COMMENTS No Comments

SCANNED EVIDENCE UNDER THE LAWS OF THE DUTCH CARIBBEAN

Electronic files will not be disregarded as evidence

A Netherlands Antilles or Aruban court may only base its decision on facts. An alleged fact that is not disputed by the parties is considered to be such a fact, even if it does not correspond with reality. For example, if both parties state that they were involved in a fight in Curacao, the court will assume the correctness thereof, although both parties know that the fight was actually in Bonaire. Furthermore, facts can be proven in the course of the proceedings, e.g., by showing the court an official extract of a …
Read the rest »

10
Aug 2010
CATEGORY

Legal

COMMENTS No Comments

SEE YOU IN COURT?

Arbitration as an alternative for settling disputes in Curacao

Parties with a legal dispute can turn to the public court system to settle the dispute; however, instead of bringing a lawsuit in a public court, they can also opt for arbitration. Arbitration is a form of private dispute settlement in which the parties instruct one or more persons (arbitrators) to render a binding decision on their dispute. The arbitrators may be jurists, but they can also be laypersons. People with specific expertise or experience in a certain branch or industry are often chosen as arbitrator.

Parties …
Read the rest »

04
Jun 2010
CATEGORY

Legal

COMMENTS No Comments

COMMENCING PROCEEDINGS AGAINST MULTIPLE DEFENDANTS IN THE DUTCH CARIBBEAN

Non-residents can be sued

A general rule under the Netherlands Antilles code of civil procedure is that the Curacao court (or another court in the Dutch Caribbean as the case may be) has jurisdiction over defendants which are (in this example) Curacao residents or companies with an office in Curacao. In the case of multiple defendants, there is a general rule to the effect that if a Netherlands Antilles court has jurisdiction over one of the defendants (i.e., where the defendant has its corporate seat or domicile) it has jurisdiction over all defendants, including non-Netherlands Antilles residents or companies in cases …
Read the rest »

28
May 2010
CATEGORY

Legal

COMMENTS No Comments